Insurance Expert

Insurance
Ask Rene Swindley, CEO of Initio Insurance, questions relating to insurance.

Rene is the founder of digital insurance platform Initio, which is about insuring houses online in real time to provide a faster, smoother and customer-first approach to property insurance.

Shortfall liability

larry asks:

We have tenanted a small one bed studio. During the tenant's occupation a pipe burst flooding the bedroom. The tenant temporarily vacated. We removed the carpets and placed a dryer/blower overnight. We arrived next morning to find the appliance had failed and caused a fire causing extensive smoke damage to the tenant's possessions. The tenant was reportedly underinsured by some $10,000 and is pursuing reimbursement. My question is are we liable for the shortfall of our tenant’s insurance?

 

 

Read the answer from our expert »

Cover for dodgy work?

Janet asks:

I was only recently made aware that sanitary plumbing, gasfitting and drainlaying are regulated industries in New Zealand and that it is illegal to do this restricted work unless authorised by the Plumbers, Gasfitters and Drainlayers Board (PGDB).

I've hired a trader to replace roof nails and repaint the roof. I made the payments after he told me he's completed the job but when I did the inspection at the house afterwards I realized he did not do it at all. I tried to contact him through several means but I've had no response at all. He also did a dangerous rangehood install where I had to ask the builder to temporarily fix it.

These are my questions:

1. Is repairing a roof a restricted job?

2. Is installing a rangehood a restricted job too?

3. Am I able to claim insurance for the damages he's made to the house?

4. What can I do to claim my money back for the incomplete job and additional costs associated with these? 

Read the answer from our expert »

Insuring damage

Ash asks:

Regarding the new law where landlords have to provide insurance information to a new tenant so that the tenant will know their liability (which is bond money or the landlord’s insurance excess, whichever is lower). It means that tenants can get away with trashing a property only to pay the excess amount of landlord’s insurance which would always be lower than bond money.

Are there any other tactics which would bind tenants for what they are actually liable for? For example, would increasing the excess to of insurance to more than $2,000 give some relief to a landlord?

 

 

Read the answer from our expert »

Search the Ask an Expert archive

Browse all questions in the Ask An Expert Archive »

Site by PHP Developer